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Vaccination coverage in children

Vaccination coverage in children 2015 (or last available year)

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CountriesPercentage of infants vaccinated against diphtheria: Total [Rate]Percentage of infants vaccinated against tetanus: Total [Rate]Percentage of infants vaccinated against pertussis: Total [Rate]Percentage of children vaccinated against measles: Total [Rate]Percentage of infants vaccinated against poliomyelitis: Total [Rate]Percentage of infants vaccinated against mumps: Total [Rate]Percentage of infants vaccinated against rubella: Total [Rate]
Austria87.087.087.095.087.095.095.0
Belgium98.098.098.096.098.096.096.0
Bulgaria92.092.092.092.092.092.092.0
Croatia93.093.093.090.093.090.090.0
Cyprus97.097.097.090.097.090.090.0
Czech Republic97.097.097.098.096.098.098.0
Denmark94.094.094.094.094.094.094.0
Estonia93.093.093.093.093.093.093.0
EU2896.296.296.293.695.693.693.5
Finland92.092.092.095.092.095.095.0
France99.099.099.090.099.090.091.0
Germany96.096.096.097.095.097.097.0
Greece99.099.099.097.099.097.097.0
Hungary99.099.099.099.099.099.099.0
Ireland95.095.095.093.095.093.092.0
Italy93.093.093.085.093.085.085.0
Latvia98.098.098.093.098.093.093.0
Lithuania97.097.097.094.095.094.094.0
Luxembourg99.099.099.099.099.099.099.0
Malta97.097.097.093.097.093.093.0
NETHERLANDS95.095.095.094.095.094.094.0
Poland98.098.098.096.092.096.098.0
Portugal98.098.098.098.098.098.098.0
Romania89.089.089.086.089.086.086.0
Slovakia96.096.096.095.096.095.095.0
Slovenia95.095.095.094.095.094.092.0
Spain97.097.097.097.097.097.097.0
Sweden98.098.098.097.098.097.097.0
United Kingdom94.094.094.092.094.092.092.0
  • Last available year differs from country to country and from vaccination to vaccination. See source for details.

56. Vaccination coverage in children


Definition

Percentage of infants who have been fully vaccinated against important infectious childhood diseases.

Rationale

Immunisation is one of the most powerful and cost-effective forms of primary prevention. A classical prevention strategy which should be maintained to continue effective protection.

Relevant policy areas

  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Health threats, communicable  diseases
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)
  • Child health (including young adults)

More information

Influenza vaccination rate in elderly

Influenza rate in elderly 2014

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CountriesInfluenza vaccination rate in elderly: Total [Percentage]Influenza vaccination rate in elderly: Men [Percentage]Influenza vaccination rate in elderly: Women [Percentage]
Austria20.822.819.3
Belgium59.458.759.9
Bulgaria2.42.12.7
Croatia24.425.923.5
Cyprus32.432.332.4
Czech Republic15.515.615.4
Denmark4847.948.1
Estonia1.51.31.5
EU2845.947.744.5
France55.357.153.9
Germany47.648.546.9
Greece51.450.752
Hungary28.629.328.2
Ireland51.25052.2
Italy42.342.642
Latvia3.94.23.8
Lithuania5.25.94.9
Luxembourg4648.744
Malta53.455.251.9
NETHERLANDS72.973.372.6
Poland9.611.18.7
Portugal4748.446
Romania5.555.9
Slovakia14.314.514.2
Slovenia11.514.19.8
Spain56.859.354.8
Sweden37.837.138.4
United Kingdom78.679.577.9

57. Influenza vaccination rate in elderly


Definition

Proportion of elderly individuals (65 years or over) reporting to have received one shot of influenza vaccine during the last 12 months.

Rationale

Influenza vaccination in elderly is important for reducing the disease burden of influenza, including mortality.

Relevant policy areas

  • Healthy ageing, ageing population
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Health threats, communicable  diseases
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)

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Breast cancer screening

Breast cancer screening 2014

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CountriesBreast cancer screening in the past two years: Women [Percentage]
Austria82.7
Belgium83.6
Bulgaria45.1
Croatia78.9
Cyprus76.3
Czech Republic86.1
Denmark88.6
Estonia59.2
EU2879
Finland94.5
France91.2
Germany81.8
Greece68.7
Hungary77
Ireland79.7
Italy80.7
Latvia61.4
Lithuania61.8
Luxembourg88.5
Malta68.2
NETHERLANDS87.6
Poland71.3
Portugal91.2
Romania11.8
Slovakia68.6
Slovenia72
Spain88.9
Sweden94.8
United Kingdom78.7

58. Breast cancer screening


Definition

Proportion of women (aged 50-69) reporting to have undergone a breast cancer screening test within the past two years.

Rationale

Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women; it represents 15 to 35% of all cancers diagnosed in Europe. Population-based cancer registries have consistently documented a continuing rise of incidence rates since the 1960s. Breast cancer screening programmes based on mammography and organised at the population level allow an effective decrease of breast cancer mortality by 30% among women aged 50 to 69 years. Information collected in population surveys can be directly used by the public health decision makers in order to possibly adapt the organisation of the prevention/screening programmes. The domain of breast cancer screening is a priority in European Community public health policy.

Relevant policy areas

  • Healthy ageing, ageing population
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Non-Communicable diseases (NCD), chronic diseases
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)
  • (Planning of) health care resources

More information

 

Cervical cancer screening

Cervical cancer screening 2014

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CountriesCervical cancer screening in the past three years: Women [Percentage]
Austria86.6
Belgium75.4
Bulgaria52.2
Croatia77
Cyprus64.6
Czech Republic87.2
Denmark63.6
Estonia57.7
EU2870.8
Finland79.8
France81.9
Germany80.4
Greece75.5
Hungary70.6
Ireland68.3
Italy69.8
Latvia78.4
Lithuania61.9
Luxembourg83.6
Malta62.3
NETHERLANDS48.8
Poland71.7
Portugal71.1
Romania27
Slovakia69
Slovenia77.3
Spain69
Sweden80.1
United Kingdom62.8

59. Cervical cancer screening


Definition

Proportion of women (aged 20-69) reporting to have undergone a cervical cancer screening test within the past three years.

Rationale

Among all malignant tumors, cervical cancer is the one that can be most effectively controlled by screening. Detection of cytological abnormalities by microscopic examination of Pap smears, and subsequent treatment of women with high-grade cytological abnormalities avoids development of cancer. Information collected in population surveys can be directly used by the public health decision makers in order to possibly adapt the organization of the prevention/screening programmes. The domain of cervical cancer screening is a priority in European Community public health policy.

Relevant policy areas

  • Healthy ageing, ageing population
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Non-Communicable diseases (NCD), chronic diseases
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)
  • (Planning of) health care resources

More information

Colon cancer screening

Colon cancer screening 2014

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CountriesColon cancer screening in the past two years: Total [Percentage]Colon cancer screening in the past two years: Men [Percentage]Colon cancer screening in the past two years: Women [Percentage]
Austria58.860.257.6
Belgium20.421.519.3
Bulgaria6.96.57.3
Croatia27.625.829.1
Cyprus5.65.45.9
Czech Republic51.347.854.5
Denmark38.23937.4
Estonia9.18.49.6
EU2836.836.836.8
Finland16.316.516.1
France55.75556.3
Germany61.560.462.5
Greece14.215.213.2
Hungary16.715.317.9
Ireland24.127.321
Italy38.83938.6
Latvia27.321.631.3
Lithuania26.620.930.7
Luxembourg30.23525.6
Malta19.521.617.4
NETHERLANDS11.712.810.7
Poland8.698.2
Portugal40.640.240.8
Romania4.34.14.4
Slovakia32.531.233.6
Slovenia60.458.362.3
Spain141414
Sweden2321.624.5
United Kingdom43.444.442.4

60. Colon cancer screening


Definition

Proportion of persons (aged 50-74) reporting to have undergone a colorectal cancer screening test in the past 2 years.

Rationale

  • Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent cancer among males and the second among women. Colorectal cancer mortality can be reduced through screening from the age of 50.
  • Information collected in population surveys can be directly used by the public health decision makers in order to possibly adapt the organisation of the prevention/screening programmes. The domain of colon cancer screening is a priority in European Community public health policy.

Relevant policy areas

  • Healthy ageing, ageing population
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Non-Communicable diseases (NCD), chronic diseases
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)
  • (Planning of) health care resources

More information

Timing of first antenatal visit among pregnant women

This is a Work-in-progress indicator. Work-in-progress indicators are (nearly) ready for incorporation in regular international data collections, but not yet used in practice. There (nearly) is consensus on the indicator definition and calculation, and da

61. Timing of first antenatal visit among pregnant women


Definition

Percentage of women having their first antenatal visit in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester or having no visits. Antenatal visit refers to a visit to a certified health care professional, e.g. general practitioner, obstetrician, midwife and public health nurse. Only visits to examinations and/or pregnancy-related advice are to be included. Mere prescription of a pregnancy test or booking in a maternity unit should be excluded.

Rationale

Antenatal care is the best preventive care for pregnant women to reduce morbidity and mortality in both mothers and their babies. Antenatal visits allow for the management of pregnancy, detection and treatment of complications and promotion of good health. It provides an indication of access to antenatal care. It is a better indicator for international comparisons than an indicator based on recommendations about the optimal number of antenatal visits, which vary according to policy differences among Member States.

Relevant policy areas

  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Maternal and perinatal health
  • (Preventable) Burden of Disease (BoD)
  • Child health (including young adults)
  • (Planning of) health care resources

More information

Patient mobility

This is a Work-in-progress indicator. Work-in-progress indicators are (nearly) ready for incorporation in regular international data collections, but not yet used in practice. There (nearly) is consensus on the indicator definition and calculation, and da

75. Patient mobility


Definition

Absolute number and percentage of non-resident people among all people being discharged from hospital.

Rationale

Meets the increasingly important EU-health policy issue of cross-border care. Increased patient mobility raises a number of issues and concerns in Member States in respect of e.g. health care availability and utilisation, health infrastructure development, cost sharing and patient safety.

Relevant policy areas

  • Sustainable health care systems
  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • (Planning of) health care resources
  • Health care costs and utilization

More information

Insurance coverage

Nodata available jet

76. Insurance coverage


Definition

The proportion of the population covered by health insurance, taking into account both public and private insurance schemes.

Rationale

Indicator describing (equal) access to services. Indicator for social inequalities in health care system.

Relevant policy areas

  • Sustainable health care systems
  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)

More information

Expenditures on health care

Current health care expenditure 2012

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CountriesCurrent health care expenditure (PPS): Million PPS [Million purchasing power standards (PPS)]Health care expenditure (PPS): Million PPS [Million purchasing power standards (PPS)]Current health care expenditure (GDP): Percentage of GDP [Percentage of gross domestic product (GDP)]Health care expenditure (GDP): Percentage of GDP[Percentage of gross domestic product (GDP)]
Austria29028.63094310.411.1
Belgium36282.336282.310.910.9
Bulgaria6785.96837.37.77.7
Croatia4640.14767.177.2
Cyprus1447.61475.57.37.4
Czech Republic16720.6170107.47.6
Denmark17906.518567.710.611
Estonia1431.81451.35.85.9
Finland13579.514247.18.79.1
France207256.9215655.111.211.6
Germany288890.9298853.110.911.3
Greece19916.520155.49.29.3
Hungary13607.614030.27.78
Latvia1691.31830.666.5
Lithuania3582.13752.26.46.7
Luxembourg2128.72256.36.87.2
NETHERLANDS63382.764945.611.812.1
Poland4545248493.26.36.8
Portugal1946420606.79.710.2
Romania14766.415031.25.55.6
Slovakia7846.98219.87.68
Slovenia3637.137688.68.9
Spain99817.7101303.89.29.3
Sweden2719628735.59.19.6
  • Most recent year for Latvia is 2010
  • Most recent year for Bulgaria, Portugal, Slovakia en Slovenia is 2011
  • Most recent year for The Netherland (Health care expenditure ) is 2011

77. Expenditures on health care


Definition

Current and total national health expenditure for total, public, and private sectors, as percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), and expressed in millions of Purchasing Power Standard (PPS).

Rationale

Next to external, biological and environmental factors, the provision of health care goods and services and its financing within country’s health care system is perceived as a main determinant of health. Health care expenditure is an indicator for long-term sustainability of health care systems.

Relevant policy areas

  • Sustainable health systems
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Health care costs and utilization

More information

Survival rates cancer

Nodata available jet

78. Survival rates cancer


Definition

The relative survival rate for (10 different groups of) cancer; the proportion of patients who survive at least five years after diagnosis, after correction for background mortality.

Rationale

High burden diseases. Cancer survival is an indicator of the effectiveness of a country’s health care system in the area of cancer screening, screening/early detection and treatment. The health care system can improve the survival of certain cancers through early detection and appropriate treatment. Monitoring of a larger array of important cancers is important for the overall effectiveness of the system, including prevention.

Relevant policy areas

Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety

More information

30-day in-hospital case-fatality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and ischemic stroke

Nodata available jet

79. 30-day in-hospital case-fatality of AMI and ischemic stroke


Definition

OECD indicator: admission-based AMI and ischemic stroke 30 day in-hospital (same hospital) mortality rate. This indicator is defined as the age-sex standardised percentage of people aged 45+ who die within 30 days of being admitted to a hospital in a specified year with principal diagnosis of: a) acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or b) ischemic stroke.

Rationale

AMI and ischemic stroke are important causes of death in European countries. Also the burden of disease and health care costs are considerable. Adequate and timely treatment can improve survival. This indicator measures the quality of the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic cardiovascular diseases in hospitals.

Relevant policy areas

  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety

More information

Equity of access to health care services

Nodata available jet

80. Equity of access to health care services


Definition

Index of self-declared unmet need for health care services. Defined as the total self-reported unmet need for medical care (medical examination or treatment) for the following three reasons: financial barriers + waiting times + too far to travel.

Rationale

The self-reported unmet need for medical examination or treatment is an indicator for equity of access to health care services. It gives insight into the need for medical care and the obstacles that stand in the way of the actual use of health care services. As such it can provide useful information on how to overcome the obstacles for use and improve health. The underlying assumption is that the self-reported unmet need corresponds with the actual need for medical care.

Relevant policy areas

  • Sustainable health systems
  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Health in All Policies (HiAP)

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Waiting times for elective surgeries (D)

This section contains those indicator topics that are not ready yet for incorporation in international regular data collections (and thus for implementation) due to considerable methodological and/or data availability problems.

81. Waiting times for elective surgeries


Definition

Average inpatient waiting time for elective (i.e. non-urgent) surgeries of Percutanerous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA), hip replacement and cataract operation, measured in number of days. Elective surgery is defined as when surgery is necessary, but the timing of the procedure can be scheduled and the patient can be sent home.

Rationale

Indicator for the accessibility of health care, with focus on elective interventions. Long waiting times can lead to deterioration in health, loss of effectiveness and extra costs. They generate dissatisfaction for the patients and among the general public

Relevant policy areas

  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • (Planning of) health care resources

More information

Surgical wound infections (D)

This section contains those indicator topics that are not ready yet for incorporation in international regular data collections (and thus for implementation) due to considerable methodological and/or data availability problems.

82. Surgical wound infections


Definition

To be developed (see key issues and problems)

Rationale

Indicator for the safety of operative interventions. Wound infection can lead to re-operation and prolonged hospital stay, to increased morbidity and mortality for patients and to increased costs for the health care system. Amenable to interventions: the incidence of wound infection can be reduced by proper pre-, intra- and post-operative care, in particular strict hygiene.

Relevant policy areas

  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Health threats, communicable  diseases
  • Preventable health risks

More information

Cancer treatment delay (D)

This section contains those indicator topics that are not ready yet for incorporation in international regular data collections (and thus for implementation) due to considerable methodological and/or data availability problems.

83. Cancer treatment delay


Definition

To be established, e.g. the average time (in days) between the date of first visit to general practitioner and the date of first treatment, by cancer site (breast, colon and rectal cancer). Time between incidence date and date of first treatment could also be an option.

Rationale

Indicator for the quality of cancer care. Indicators on cancer treatment quality are necessary to investigate the determinants of inequalities across Europe in terms of care. Explains part of the differences in cancer survival.

Relevant policy areas

  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, quality of care, efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Non-Communicable diseases (NCD), chronic diseases

More information

Diabetes control (D)

This section contains those indicator topics that are not ready yet for incorporation in international regular data collections (and thus for implementation) due to considerable methodological and/or data availability problems.

84. Diabetes control


Definition

Proportion of adult diabetics receiving appropriate care, in terms of regular retinal exams.

Rationale

Indicator for the quality of diabetes care. Nearly all patients who have type 1 diabetes for about 20 years will have evidence of diabetic retinopathy. Timely treatment and appropriate follow-up care can delay progression and eventual blindness.

Relevant policy areas

  • Healthy ageing, ageing population
  • Health inequalities (including accessibility of care)
  • Health system performance, Quality of care, Efficiency of care, patient safety
  • Non-Communicable diseases (NCD), chronic diseases
  • Preventable health risks

More information